Candiani, Italian premium denim manufacturer, and Lenzing Group, specialised manufacturer of cellulosic fibers, have launched the Candiani-Tencel X Coreva Limited Edition Hemp, a collaboration project meant to sensitivise consumers and insiders to follow more sustainable paths, and recall attention on new fabrics made with fibers that can become alternative to cotton.

Candiani-Tencel Limited Edition Hemp
Photo: Maria Cristina Pavarini
Candiani-Tencel Limited Edition Hemp
For the occasion, inside the Candiani store in Corso di Porta Ticinese 22 in Milan, the two players presented a limited edition of 50 oversize shirts for woman made with a new Coreva stretch denim that also includes an innovative Tencel variant made with hemp fibers. The same limited-edition fabric will also be available at the Candiani Custom Microfactory at 3 Mentana Square for those who want a customized jean.





"We have started this new project as we wanted to continue our experimentation toward new sustainable fiber developments," commented Carlo Covini, project manager marketing textiles, Lenzing. "In the last years, we have been developing some different fiber solutions meant to help the apparel market become more sustainable and increasingly embrace a circular economy business model. We did it a few years ago when we launched Tencel X Refibra, a technology that upcycles cotton and wood scraps, and adds them to new Tencel fibers, for making a new very similar material."

Carlo Covini, Tencel
Photo: Carlo Covini
Carlo Covini, Tencel
And he continued: "We also did it when we launched the Orange Fiber & Tencel Limited Edition Initiative about a year ago. Also in that case, we recycled orange peel, another cellulose-rich material that could be recycled and be used for producing new Tencel fibers. We think it's important trying to find new directions in our industry. Obviously, other problems may come up once we want to produce such alternative fibers at industrial scale as each raw material needs to be purified and be prepared in advance to meet our productive standards," continued Covini.
A new fiber made from oranges created by Tencel x Orange Fiber
Photo: Luca Distefano
A new fiber made from oranges created by Tencel x Orange Fiber
Candiani was happy to collaborate the project, too, as it was involved in other similar forward-thinking initiatives before, while it discovered that it shares many common aspects with Lenzing. For instance, both are European, and are not based very far from each other. Both were founded in 1938, and are focused on R&D, especially in the sustainability field, and like to share their achievements both at B2B and sometimes at B2C, too.
Simon Giuliani, Candiani Denim
Photo: Candiani Denim
Simon Giuliani, Candiani Denim
"We like to take alternative paths that can help lower the industry's impact and show new consumption models," said Simon Giuliani, global marketing director, Candiani. "After the launch in 2018 of Re-Gen, a denim made by 50% of Tencel X Refibra and by 50% of recycled cotton both on warp and weft, and we were prized with the ITMA Sustainable Innovation Award in 2019. Then, along with other innovations, we developed Coreva, a plant-based yarn made from natural rubber that can be used to produce a stretch biodegradable denim that has the same characteristics of elasticity and durability of regular jeans."

 



The new denim shirts are made with about 20% Tencel Limited Edition Hemp fibers, 68% organic cotton and 2% Coreva and sold at €185 at retail, at the same price of a Candiani Coreva denim shirt.

Candiani Denim Store, Corso di Porta Ticinese, Milan
Photo: Maria Cristina Pavarini
Candiani Denim Store, Corso di Porta Ticinese, Milan
Giuliani continued: "Hemp is a much used material in the denim industry for its qualities: it grows easily, requires little water, needs no chemicals nor pesticides and its plant can be used entirely. Despite this, it has a problem with its hand. Though Lenzing has developed a technique for obtaining a super soft hand fiber and we, at Candiani, added it with a supernatural stretch denim and achieved a great result also in terms of sustainability."




"We are offering these shirts as we obviously want to sell them, but also want to see how consumers react to them. It's important how we explain the characteristics of each of our new products. Moreover, the brands we sell our fabric to could find inspiration from us how to explain their products' characteristics," underlined Giuliani.
Candiani Denim Store, Corso di Porta Ticinese, Milan
Photo: Maria Cristina Pavarini
Candiani Denim Store, Corso di Porta Ticinese, Milan
The Porta Ticinese store, whose lay-out was recently changed and is now hosting some sewing machines at the entrance, has also evolved to help establish a different relationship with the final consumer. "Here customers can ask to make some small adjustments to their purchase-be it a hem, a small change in its fit or some repairing," added Giuliani.




"Or if after one year, consumers want to add a small decor that can help their jeans or chinos look fresher and new, we can do it. And not less important, we want to teach them they can trust their local shop, where they can find specialised personnel always ready to help them and avoid they throw away their jeans only after a few months," he continued.





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