Grain-based coatings, 3D printed morphogenesis effect accessories and hangers made from unused clothes may not bring a revolution, but will surely lead to a more responsible and innovative fashion era. Here is a round-up of the latest in fabrics and fibers…


Caliks new transparency achievement
Today’s environmentally conscious consumers demand more detailed information about what they purchase than the previous generation. As a result of this, companies feel the need to become more sustainable and transparent to be more reliable and trustworthy.

Calik Denim aims to become more transparent
Photo: Calik Denim
Calik Denim aims to become more transparent
Thus Calik Denim has developed and launched its QR Code Integrated System through which customers can learn more about their jeans’ denim such as what fibers were used, the fabric’s LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) scores and environmental impact according to eight different areas connected to climate change, photochemical oxidation, energy demand, acidification, land use, water consumption, eutrophication and ozone layer depletion–all data verified by this party’s entities. As part of Calik’s first release, such information can be obtained by scanning the QR code added to 56 of products' hangtags.


Can morphogenesis help to save nature?
Los Angeles designer Julia Daviy has created innovative, ethical, cruelty-free, carbon-neutral, sustainable bags and jewel pieces by using a zero waste 3D printing technique.
3D printed bag by Julia Daviy
Photo: Julia Daviy
3D printed bag by Julia Daviy
Her bags produce 92% less CO2 emissions in the supply chain than traditional ones and their design is inspired by morphogenesis that similarly to nature produces differentiation from groups of identical cells and develops shapes. Daviy's 3D printed bags are made with nylon, metal alloys and flexible resin. Retail prices range from US$89 to US$1,750.


New life to old cashmere
Lineapiù, an Italian knitwear yarn manufacturer, has developed Endless, a new line of recycled cashmere GRS (Global Recycle Standard) certified yarn, available in 35 different hues.
Lineapiù Endless cashmere
Photo: Lineapiù
Lineapiù Endless cashmere
By recycling these yarns that are already dyed, their production requires less dyeing substances, energy and water.


Scarpas new spirit
Scarpa’s Spirit model is a new shoe that can be worn in leisure time and for light hiking activities. This sneaker’s upper is made with cotton canvas that is made 70% out of recycled cotton and 30% out of biologic cotton, and has its uppers’ reinforcement areas and a midsole made with recycled biodegradable and renewable rubber.
Spirit sneaker by Scarpa
Photo: Scarpa
Spirit sneaker by Scarpa
Its laces are made with 100% recycled polyethylene from packaging, bottles and food containers, while a shock-absorbing midsole is made with 15% recycled EVA. Although its soles’ rubber is made from 40% recycled and 30% natural rubber, as part of its special rubber mix Supergum, their grip and durability maintains high standards.


When reducing ones impact is good for forests
Hyosung, one of the world’s largest spandex manufacturers, has recently developed its 100% recycled Creora Regen spandex made from 100% reclaimed waste from internal production.
A third-party certifier compared results of this new material’s Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) with the environmental performance of its virgin Creora spandex and calculated the amount of CO2 emitted from the entire life cycle of both fibers–from pre-manufacturing to the manufacturing stage. The final result showed that Creora Regen spandex reduces carbon dioxide production by approximately 67% compared to its virgin Creora Spandex.
Creora Regen spandex
Photo: Creora/Hyosung
Creora Regen spandex
Since the launch of Creora Regen in January 2020, the company has produced an amount of fiber to offset the number of CO2 emissions equivalent to driving 1,000 times around the globe. Similarly, the production of this eco-friendly fiber has the greenhouse gas (GHG) absorption impact of enough mature pine trees to cover San Francisco’s Presidio–the world’s largest national park in an urban area spanning nearly 1,500 acres (about six square kilometers).


How Mawa hangers can save our planet
As 90% of unwanted clothes end up in landfill or incinerators, German hanger manufacturer Mawa has developed a new selection of eco-hangers made from a bio-material, made of a 100% eco-material based on renewable raw materials and textile fibers.

By upcycling textile materials, the company avoids throwing away and burning textile waste from clothing and fabric scraps, and estimates it produces up to 85% less CO2 emissions. In addition, as part of this project any brand can decide to recycle its own fabric scraps from fashion production.
Eco hangers by Mawa
Photo: Mawa
Eco hangers by Mawa
Mawa also cares for its other hangers’ impact as all its wooden hangers are made with FSC-certified wood from Europe only and for its metal hangers it has changed its formula and only uses PVC without phthalates, lead or cadmium, in order to guarantee that no hazardous substance comes into contact with clothing or the wearer’s skin.


When Lafuma limits its emissions
For s/s 2021, sportswear brand Lafuma has launched its Limited Emission Collection, whose pieces are made by recycling surplus production or items destined to be destroyed.
Poncho of Lafuma's Limited Emission Collection
Photo: Lafuma
Poncho of Lafuma's Limited Emission Collection
This way these pieces are made while cutting up to 30% carbon emissions as calculated by French Agency of the Environment and Energy Management. Part of this capsule are Niagara LTD Poncho and the lightweight packable jackets Windlight LTD and the Windlight Long LTD, sold at prices between €89.99 and €99.99.


Polartec’s future lies upon eco-engineering
Polartec, a US specialist offering innovative and sustainable textile solutions, has eliminated PFAS (per- and polyfluoralkyl substances) in its DWR (Durable Water Repellent) treatments across its line of performance fabrics. This non-PFAS treatment, the latest in Polartec’s growing EcoEngineering initiative, guarantees no loss of durability or water repellence.
Polartec has installed a new non-PFAS treatment.
Photo: Polartec
Polartec has installed a new non-PFAS treatment.
This new weather protection fabric treatment will be used in various products including Hardface, Power Shield, Power Shield Pro, NeoShell and Windbloc. The technology will also extend to fleece and insulation treatments for greater moisture management on products such as Thermal Pro and Alpha.


New coatings from grain
Berlin-based fashion label Raffauf uses a new textile coating obtained from waste materials left after grain processing.

After the grain is harvested, it is separated from the husk and processed into flour and other food products. Byproducts such as bran and oils are also extracted from the husk, and this process leaves a waxy substance that is usually disposed of as a waste product. The wax is hardly usable as a raw material in its solid state.
Textile coating obtained from waste materials left after grain processing by Raffauf
Photo: Raffauf
Textile coating obtained from waste materials left after grain processing by Raffauf
To turn it into a coating, it is heated and melted for several hours. In its liquid form, it is mixed with contaminant-free additives that make the wax water-soluble, and the result is a homogeneous liquid that can be applied evenly to fabrics without leaving stains. The finished coating consists of 90% recycled biological waste from grain processing that guarantees clothes to become resistant to water and water-based liquids such as teas and fruit juices.

In the current collection, Raffauf uses the coating from grain waste on linen and soon will test it on organic cotton and recycled natural fibers.


Building trusted cotton relationships
5Loc Cotton is a new platform through which manufacturers and brands can find trusted sustainable cotton suppliers according to the 17 SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals).

The company is led by Brent Crossland, a longtime cotton expert in cotton production and marketing, with a focus on crop protection, product development and launch, seed production and the global textile supply chain.
Brent Crossland, founder, 5Loc Cotton
Photo: 5Loc Cotton
Brent Crossland, founder, 5Loc Cotton
5Loc Cotton was designed to work with cotton identity programs or branded cotton, such as Better Cotton Initiative, the U.S. Trust Protocol, E3, and Supima, as well as growers of organic cotton, non-GMO hybrid cotton, transitional cotton and regenerative cotton.

The platform aims to connect manufacturers and brands to build a trusted and responsible supply chain that includes farmers and farmer groups, ginners, cotton merchants, shippers, manufacturers, apparel and home goods apparel, retailers and preferred cotton initiatives.

It can also deliver traceability metrics, certifications and data to help manufacturers and brands meet their short- and long-term sustainability goals.



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