CDP (Carbon Disclosure Project) Global is an international non-profit organization that runs a global disclosure system for investors, companies, cities, states and regions to manage their environmental impacts. Every year, it releases an annual environmental disclosure and scoring process that is widely recognized as the gold standard of corporate environmental transparency.
CDP graphic
Photo: CDP
CDP graphic
In 2022, over 680 investors with over US$130 trillion in assets and 280 major purchasers with US$6.4 trillion in procurement spend requested companies to disclose data on environmental impacts, risks and opportunities through CDP’s platform. This year, a record-breaking 18,700 companies responded.

 



Among some of the best scores gained this year by players in the textile and apparel industry, there are LVMH Group, Lenzing and Fast Retailing Group.

 



LVMH and Lenzing get "AAA" by CDP
Lvmh, the French luxury group that owns maisons such as Louis Vuitton, Dior and Fendi, has been awarded triple A status by the Cdp-Carbon disclosure project. The French luxury giant was honored for its leadership in corporate transparency and performance on climate change, forest and water conservation by the international environmental organization.

A look b y Fendi, part of LVMH
Photo: Fendi
A look b y Fendi, part of LVMH
The Lenzing Group, a global supplier of specialty fibers for the textile and nonwovens industries, has been recognized by CDP for its transparency and performance in the areas of climate, forests and water security and has been included in its annual "A List" and received a triple A (AAA) rating for the second year in a row together with only twelve companies worldwide.
Apparel made with Tencel
Photo: Tencel
Apparel made with Tencel
"The rating shows that we are already on a good track with our sustainability strategy and that the steps we are taking as the Lenzing Group to continuously improve and find solutions to the most pressing issues of our time are being noticed and honored," said Stephan Sielaff, CEO of the Lenzing Group.
Stephan Sielaff
Photo: Lenzing
Stephan Sielaff
"We are committed to making our industries even more sustainable and to transforming the textile business from a linear to a model to drive forward the circular economy. Further efforts are needed from the entire industry to accelerate this change," explains Sielaff.

 



The company is involved in a responsible use of resources as, for instance, the fiber pulp derived from wood and water are among the most important raw materials for the sustainable production of Lenzing cellulose fibers and also among the most important core areas of the Lenzing Group's sustainability strategy.




 

Lenzing sources wood and dissolving pulp from sustainably managed forests and plantations and not from old-growth, protected or endangered forests. Lenzing's bio-refinery process ensures that 100% of the wood ingredients are used to produce fiber pulp for fiber production, bio-refinery products and bioenergy.




In addition, with Refibra and Eco Cycle technologies, Lenzing offers solutions for the conversion of the textile and nonwovens industry from a linear to a circular economy.




 

Transparency is also at the basis of the group strategy through a specific fiber identification system and e-branding service, while the Textile Genesis blockchain project uses data to enable maximum traceability.

Jack & Jones collection made with tencel Refibra
Photo: Lenzing
Jack & Jones collection made with tencel Refibra
Lenzing Group's overall environmental impact is also focused to achieve a low-emission and carbon-neutral footprint by 2050.

 



Europe plays it cool
The year 2022 has shown a significant result of "A" rated companies from Europe, as explained by Maxfield Weiss, executive director, CDP Europe. "This year, around 20,000 companies disclosed their environmental data to CDP, including 70% of European companies by market value," he said.

 



"COP 27 has shown that fundamental change is needed more than ever if we are to limit global warming to 1.5 °C. I am therefore pleased that European companies make up almost half of all companies on the 'A list' globally, including 15 with two 'A' ratings and eight with three times 'A' for their leadership on climate, forests and water security. We need to halve emissions and stop deforestation by 2030, while securing water supplies over the same period - we can't meet the 1.5 degree target without nature," continued Weiss.




 

"With the EU's ground-breaking new Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive (CSRD) now adopted, CDP's 'A-list' companies are showing they are ahead of the game. They are taking clear action to reduce emissions and manage environmental impacts throughout their value chain. This is the kind of environmental transparency and action we need across the economy to prevent environmental collapse," continued the manager of CDP Europe.

 



 

Fast Retailing, an "AA" rating from Asia
Fast Retailing, the Japanese retail holding company behind various brands including Uniqlo, GU, Theory, PLST (Plus T), Comptoir des Cotonniers, Princesse Tam Tam, J Brand, and Helmut Lang, has also been recognized for leadership in corporate transparency and performance on climate change and water security by CDP, securing a place on its annual ‘A List’ receiving a double "A" (AA) rating.

Uniqlo store in Shanghai
Photo: Fast Retailing
Uniqlo store in Shanghai
Based on data reported through CDP’s 2022 Climate Change and Water Security questionnaires, Fast Retailing is one of a few companies that achieved a double ‘A’, out of more than 10,000 companies scored.

 



Yukihiro Nitta, group executive officer responsible for sustainability, Fast Retailing, commented about the recognisement: “We are very pleased to be recognized by CDP for our transparency efforts. Everyone at Fast Retailing is committed to demonstrating an entirely new type of apparel industry to the world, where our business and our range of Life Wear products naturally prioritize sustainability. Making the 2022 A List an important milestone.”

 



Fast Retailing is offering its Life Wear concept that aspires to be the ultimate in everyday clothing, designed to make everyone's life better-to create apparel that not only emphasizes quality, design, and price, but also meets the definition of "good clothing" from the standpoint of the environment, people, and society.

Recycled down jacket from the Re.Uniqlo recycling project
Photo: Uniqlo
Recycled down jacket from the Re.Uniqlo recycling project
In September 2021, Fast Retailing announced targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, including across its supply chain, by FY2030. The company aims to reduce emissions from own operations, such as stores and main offices, by 90%, and from production of raw materials for products, fabric production, and garment manufacturing for Uniqlo and GU products by 20% (as compared to FY2019 levels, absolute amounts). Fast Retailing will also derive 100% of the proportion of electricity sourced for own operations from renewable energy by FY2030.

 

 

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