Save The Duck, the Italian animal-friendly and vegan brand, is getting ready to go public by 2028.

Save The Duck
Photo: Save The Duck
Save The Duck
This is the ambition expressed by Nicolas Bargi, founder and CEO of the B-Corp certified company which is majority owned by Reinold Geiger and André Hoffmann, respectively executive president and CEO of the multinational L’Occitane International. 





“We closed 2022 registering a turnover of €62 million and aim to reach a turnover of €74 million by the end of 2023,” he explained. “Our aim is to reach higher results and hit yearly sales of at least €250 million within the next five years. Then we can say we will be ready for IPO,” he explained implying that the focus of the company’s success comes from DACH countries, Europe, and The US, where the company has started operating recently and opened a monobrand store in New York, Soho, in October 2022 and where it aims to develop retail and e-commerce in parallel.





The company aims to continue its growth thanks to a wholesale model, that includes department stores, but also own stores, in Italy, Europe, DACH and The US.




“As part of this growth, we have also experienced a recent unexpected exploit in Japan, the only Asian country, where we have grown very well in the last two years. Therefore, our aim is to continue our partnership with the present distributor there, which is Teijin,” added Bargi. 





In order to increase its sales and reach it target, the company aims to also grow through retail, travel retail, pop-up stores, e-commerce, all channels that need to be integrated within this whole strategy.

Save The Duck
Photo: Save The Duck
Save The Duck
Despite its plans, e-commerce, which represents 10% of the company’s revenues, has slowed down its growth in 2022: “E-commerce continues to grow but not as fast as it used to,” commented Bargi. “It has been a common trend among all e-tailers as there has been a rebalancing between physical retail and e-commerce. After a booming during the Covid years, consumers feel the need to go out and shop in physical stores again. For this, I think that most important for a brand like ours is to operate through an omnichannel strategy by selling via wholesale, retail and e-commerce. Our growth has to be homogeneous, in these three channels. We have to pursue it in all three of them, parallel and integrated,” explained Bargi.



The company has also enlarged its product offer in order to keep its stores working all year round.  This way, especially for summer, it has launched the Smart Leisure, an athleisure selection, and beachwear. Along with that, it also launched accessories and footwear, always in-keeping with the brand’s vegan and animal-friendly identity.

Save The Duck
Photo: Save The Duck
Save The Duck
Starting from f/w 2023/2024 Save The Duck has started concentrating on three main iconic product categories: the basic padded jacket, to be worn at the beginning of the season; the fashion-minded lucid super oversize jacket; and the Arctic parka collection which is designed to be worn when temperatures drop. This last product category has been counting for 30% of the brand’s yearly sales in the last three years and will be the one that will grow most in the future globally, too. 





As part of its future strategies, the brand will further concentrate on new sustainable targets. “We are trying to offer our iconic pieces in a monofiber version,” explained Bargi. “That means that each jacket will be made with the same fiber in its outer part, in its padding and inner part. This way, each garment can be recycled entirely at the end of its life without the need to be divided according to its components. Therefore, its impact will be lower and different from how it is now.”




Also in-keeping with this aspect are also all their productive steps of the brand as it avoids high-emission production. “Out of our total revenues, 75% come from carry-over pieces,” continued the entrepreneur.






“This way it is very easy for us to give a continuity to production when compared with a ‘classic’ apparel company that changes its offer every season. This helps producers continue their production as they have their productive chains, and they continue manufacturing the same article. Moreover, all these items are based upon an 'eco-design' approach as they can be worn for longer. Therefore they represent a conscious purchase, which is not thrown away after a few times it’s worn, like it happens with fashion-minded pieces,” Bargi underlined hyping how the company wants to follow a holistic philosophy.

Save The Duck
Photo: Save The Duck
Save The Duck
Among other novelties on the product side there is the Pro-Tech collection, the premium and technological line of Save The Duck, an animal-friendly selection of jackets worn by climbers who have conquered over 8,000 meter high peaks like Everest, Annapurna, K2, among others.









This collection continues to be designed by the Japanese designer Satoshi Yamane, who already designed the f/w 2020 and the s/s 2021 collections, and reinterpreted Save The Duck's bestseller, imbuing them with a Pro-Tech performance, 3D embossing for hoods and the cuffs, a solid orange lining and technical aesthetics.

Save The Duck
Photo: Save The Duck
Save The Duck
The company decided to renew its collaboration with the designer from s/s 2023, with the declared aim to give Pro-Tech a unique direction and more stylistic continuity. Hence, the new collection is hinged on a new partnership with Toray, a Japanese material manufacturer which engineered for Pro-Tech an exclusive fabric with high features in terms of breathability, wind and water resistance – yet with a PFC-free outer shell and membrane - and padded with Plumtech, a down-free padding.







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