Fendi has started a whole new strategy aimed at defining tomorrow’s fashion based upon the indispensable respect for environment, quality and ethics.

The Italian luxury brand is committed in pursuing some goals of environmental sustainability and social responsibility. As part of its newly started journey it has recently laid the cornerstone of the Fendi Factory in Bagno a Ripoli, its own innovation hub dedicated to the creation, development and production of its products with the aim to focus on its holistic sustainable strategy.

The Roman maison has also unveiled a new section of its official website offering three main sections–environment, supply chain and community–through which it reveals details about the sustainable materials it employs, the environmental standards of its production sites and stores, the transparency and responsibility of its supply chain and its commitment to educating young talents through the Massoli Academy in Rome and the LVMH Institute des Métiers d’Excellence training program.

“Today sustainability is no longer only an option for companies, but an indispensable assumption to answer an always more pressing and precise request from consumers–and especially the youngest ones,” said Silvia Venturini Fendi, creative director accessories and menswear, Fendi, and president of Altaroma, a Roman haute couture event organization, during the "The Age of New Visions" digital round of conferences organized in partnership with Altaroma, Pitti Immagine, Camera Moda and Unicredit. “After this pandemic time fashion and fashion consumption will rapidly change. We will buy less, but better. More than focusing on sustainable fashion we will have to focus on ethical fashion, based on environmental defense but also supporting and preserving the whole artisanal ability of the Italian industry,” she continued underlining Fendi’s already taken path.

Fendi look, s/s '21
Photo: Fendi
Fendi look, s/s '21
In selecting its materials, Fendi has taken some clear steps. For instance, it has joined the Better Cotton Initiative. In line with the LVMH Life Targets, it has been committed to sourcing 70% of its cotton as “more sustainable cotton” by 2020, including organic cotton by GOTS and Oeko-Tex standards, and cotton sourced through BCI, while its cotton dustcovers are already sourced through BCI.

As part of its plastic-free strategy, it is committed to reducing its purchase of virgin polyester fibers and progressively replacing them with Global Recycled Standard (GRS) certified polyester, that gives post-consumer plastic bottles new shape and life.

Furthermore, in line with the LVMH Animal-Based Raw Material Charter and the LVMH Life targets, it is also committed to sourcing silk with sustainability in mind, aiming at a fully traceable supply chain and pushing to purchase silk only processed in compliance with GOTS standards.
Fendi for s/s '21
Photo: Fendi
Fendi for s/s '21
Fendi is also extending to cellulose-based fibers used for the lining and packaging of its luxury products selecting certified wood for viscose and paper obtained without harming primary forests and encouraging responsible forestry management. Another goal is to working only with suppliers that guarantee clean viscose production processes, maximizing the recirculation of chemicals and water.

As part of its aims, Fendi has also launched the FF Green Interlace Capsule Collection offering its iconic Peekaboo and Baguette models made with certified FF cotton and recycled polyester, and created through its most traditional workmanship–the Interlace technique. The fabric is cut into individual stripes, assembled and hand knotted together. The knots are then folded on the opposite side and the bag is finished with a maxi metal needle.
Fendi has launched the FF Green Interlace Capsule Collection offering its iconic Peekaboo and Baguette models made with certified FF cotton and recycled polyester.
Photo: Fendi
Fendi has launched the FF Green Interlace Capsule Collection offering its iconic Peekaboo and Baguette models made with certified FF cotton and recycled polyester.
Fendi’s has also introduced the “hand in hand” project where selected artisans, one in each Italian region, were asked to offer a unique interpretation of its iconic Baguette, transforming the traditional handbag construction into an art object. This project establishes a strong network of human relationships and is a crucial step in preserving and transmitting the rare craft, creativity and savoir-faire of local artisans across Italy.

The same eco-friendly approach has guided the creation of Fendi’s Holiday 2020 windows using architectural elements crafted from an eco-friendly and recyclable material, a sugarcane-derived foam obtained from processes using recycled and regenerated products. During the same season, in some of its flagships including London New Bond Street, Paris Avenue Montaigne, New York Madison Avenue and Rome Palazzo Fendi, the luxury house has also installed chandeliers created by disassembling 37 chandeliers part of the already existing stock of the Murano historic Mazzuccato glass firm, and reassembling them in 17 unusual ones. As many artisanal companies across the Italian country, it had its business dramatically hit by Coronavirus. As part of this same project many of these windows were glamorously decorated with 49,340 sq. meters of leather waste coming from Fendi’s production plants.
Fendi’s Holiday 2020 windows using architectural elements crafted from an eco-friendly and recyclable material
Photo: Fendi
Fendi’s Holiday 2020 windows using architectural elements crafted from an eco-friendly and recyclable material
Since 2017, Fendi has collaborated with some socially helpful projects as social cooperative Lai-Momo and its ethical fashion laboratory Cartiera, two organizations operating with the UN’s Ethical Fashion Initiative program. Fendi donates its end-of-production textiles, leather and technical equipment and Cartiera’s aspiring artisans use it to create new products including the cotton dust-bags covering Fendi’s products. Since 2020 it also collaborates with Progetto QUID, a fashion brand founded with the purpose of enabling disadvantaged and vulnerable categories of female workers enter the world of work.



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